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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
,000 jobs last month. economists were expecting more than that. at some point through superstorm sandy and how that may have impacted the results in the northeast or the adp report is seen as an indicator for jobs report. we were given new unemployment rate that i can share with you. greg: citigroup says it is cutting 11,000 jobs. about 40% of the global workforce. this they are expected to save $1.1 billion per year, and is the first major action since the banking giant named a new ceo. the group is not saying exactly how many of these lost jobs will be here in the united states are you with that they plan to close 44 branches. we do pretty big news from citigroup. republican leaders calling on obama to sit down for a face-to-face negotiation on the fiscal cliff. this is just weeks ago before the deadline. right now, as you know, there is still no deal. those sites are still hundreds of billions of dollars apart. mike emanuel has more. reporter: hello, jenna. speaker john boehner says the republicans made a good-faith effort to avert a fiscal crisis. they say essentially this is now t
. chris christie met with president obama to talk about aid following superstorm sandy. and the first family lights up their tree. now let's get you back to "hardball." >>> just to be clear, i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevents the top rate from going up for folks at the top 2%, but i do remain optimistic that we can get something done that is good for families like this one and that is good for the american economy. >> welcome back to "hardball." today president obama took his fiscal pitch outside the beltway visiting a middle class family in the virginia suburbs. the president's message is resonating with people across america. a new quinnipiac poll proves it. 53% trust president obama and the democrats more to handle the fiscal cliff negotiations. only 36% trust the "r"s in congress. joining me is nbc chief white house correspondent and political director and host of "the daily rundown," anything else you control around here? >> that's enough. >> and "the washington post's" chris cillizza. i think you've been reupped. you're all over the place. you're the greates
don't think that war ever technically ended. and superstorm sandy brought devastated and will cost tens of billions of dollars and now the president is asking congress for 60 billion to help with the cleanup. peter doocy is live in washington with the latest on the recovery efforts. >> reporter: good morning, clayton, you're right the white house wrote a letter, the speaker of the house, to request 64.4 billion dollars and the number recommends funds needed to finance a recovery effort and help the region prepare for future challenges, including future severe storms and flooding as well as impacts associated with a changing climate. just because the white house is requesting 60.4 billion dollars doesn't necessarily mean it will be easily approved by the house of representatives, because money is tight right now and as spokeman for speaker boehner says simply, we have the request and we will review it. four u.s. senators from new york and new jersey, chuck schumer robert menendez and kirsten gillibrand says the money might get caught up with people wanting it elsewhere. and it's a
to address the devastating impact that super-storm sandy had a run -- had on our regional transportation, the most widely new transportation network and unprecedented damage to our system and estimates of the damage have reached more than an $7 billion. across the regent, a train tunnels, stations, railyards all flooded with critical equipment ruined and some of that equipment, unfortunately, was barely know -- fairly new. these pieces of equipment have been rendered almost useless. we seem an almost incomprehensible of damage in this picture. a boat dragged across the new jersey transit tracks. roads and bridges were damaged, left littered with debris. the holland tunnel, a major commuter route facility, carries thousands of vehicles every day in new york city-owned it was flooded. the damage to our infrastructure did not just cause structural problems but it shut down a region. for many commuters, getting to work became a much longer, hardy was, and expensive experience. you can see why, from this picture at the hoboken have station. it's hard to believe the water was 6 feet high -- at
called to address the devastating impact that super-storm sandy had on our regional transportation, the most widely new transportation network and unprecedented damage to our system and estimates of the damage have reached more than an $7 billion. across the regent, a train tunnels, stations, railyards all flooded with critical equipment ruined and some of that equipment, unfortunately, was barely know -- fairly new. these pieces of equipment have been rendered almost useless. we seem an almost incomprehensible of damage in this picture. a boat dragged across the new jersey transit tracks. roads and bridges were damaged, left littered with debris. the holland tunnel, a major commuter route facility, carries thousands of vehicles every day in new york city-owned it was flooded. the damage to our infrastructure did not just cause structural problems but it shut down a region. for many commuters, getting to work became a much longer, hardy was, and expensive experience. you can see why, from this picture at the hoboken path station. it's hard to believe the water was 6 feet high. this
not only because of the election, maybe firms sitting on their hands but superstorm sandy. still, guys, the number much better than expected. few tuesday, which were down right before the numbers hit, turned around. they are now higher fractionally so a big turn for stock futures and better than expected jobs number for november. i can dig in more once i get to the website. but those are your headline numbers. better than expected. >> gillian, better than expected. a lot of people blamed hurricane sandy again but that's encouraging. >> i have two economists, a liberal, who both said it was going to be somewhere between 80,000 and 100,000 jobs -- say that go sandy was worth 80 -- negatively 80,000 to 100,000. you take 146,000 and this could have been a 200-plus number. >> it's interesting because it ties in with consumer data we've been seeing which actually, you know, is not great. it's not buoyant, but it's not bad. and you look at the fact what american households have been doing recently with debt and the degree of debt they've been repaying, sort of deleveraging. you add it togethe
been affected by superstorm sandy. i'm very grateful for the very productive conversations we've had with governor cuomo, with the delegation, with our appropriators, along with our leaders. i just want to thank you for being so thoughtful and hopeful in trying to create the best momentum possible for the recovery that our families need. particularly eknow that as you soffered -- suffered through hurricane katrina and the enormous work you have to do to rebuild new orleans and other surrounding areas, your advocacy during that time was extraordinary. and i really appreciated then you said that you would stand i us in the way new york stood by you in that difficult time, that was extremely kind. i also want to talk a little bit about how this storm is affecting our families and what kind of recovery is it's actually taking to rebuild. obviously millions of peoples' lives have been affected. more than 40 new yorkers, more than 40 new yorkers have died and millions were left with significant damages to their homes, neighborhoods, businesses and families. one story is a man, pedro correa
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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